Subtitles On Phones, Tablets Or Large Screens

Globetitles is a captioning and electronic playbill system. It transmits subtitles to phones and tablets and large screens too. It complements opera, theater, films, concerts, presentations or any live event. Multiple channels can be provided simultaneously, in both closed and open formats, over wireless or wired connections.

With their own devices, your audience can:

  • Attend an Italian opera, while reading along in English
  • Watch an English play and follow it in different languages
  • Receive assistance for hearing loss with captions in the language of performance (see "an important message" below)
  • Enjoy real time supplemental commentary
  • Browse an electronic program or playbill

An Illustration

The schematic below illustrates use of Globetitles for captions, translations and commentary, here for the Act III opening of Wagner's Die Walküre (with a few liberties).

English

Hoyotoho!
Hoyotoho!

vertical smart phone

Hojotoho!
Hojotoho!

"Open" English

Hoyotoho!
Hoyotoho!

The mounted screen above represents an "open" translation, meaning it is displayed in view of the whole audience.

The smartphones illustrate "personal" or "closed" channels, meaning they are transmitted to each viewer personally.

They include captions in the language of performance, and multilingual translations and commentary.

German

Hojotoho!
Hojotoho!

vertical smart phone
Spanish

¡Joiotojo!
¡Joiotojo!

vertical smart phone
English Commentary

It's a bird!
It's a plane!

vertical smart phone
Japanese

ホヨトホ!
ホヨトホ!

horizontal smart phone
Japanese Commentary

鳥だ!
飛行機だ!

horizontal smart phone

To apply to use or demo Globetitles, or for further information, kindly inquire with the form below or email [email protected]

Contact Form
First Name:
Last Name:
Email:
Message:
Comments:
Question:

What was Richard Rodgers' first name?

(Hint: Yes, it's that easy. It's to screen robots.)

Please consider sharing the following short film about helping people with hearing loss with captions.

It was made and distributed by a volunteer organization named the Collaborative for Communication Access via Captioning (CCAC), and is also available directly on YouTube.

PLAY

>